Почему Deus Ex назвали Deus Ex’омИгры

Случайно отрыл часть старого интервью с Уорреном Спетром, где он смешно объясняет почему игру назвал именно так:

«Warren: Okay, at risk of opening myself up to major ridicule from grammarians everywhere, I’ll tell you where Deus Ex comes from. I wanted to play off the literary term «Deus Ex Machina,» which is Latin for «God From a Machine.» And, yes, I know that means the name of my game translates to «God From,» and, yes, I know I’m ending the game name with a preposition, and yes, I know that’s not grammatical so sue me!
Anyway, Deus Ex Machina goes back to ancient Greek and Roman Theatre where an actor portraying one of the gods would be lowered to the stage by means of machinery pulleys and ropes and such to provide resolution to the plot and to solve the problems of mere mortals. In literary criticism, it’s come to mean a person or event in a work of fiction that comes out of nowhere other than the writer’s fevered imagination to solve seemingly unsolvable plot problems. It’s a device typically used by bad writers who’ve written themselves into corners.
If fits Deus Ex for a couple of reasons. First of all, there are several forces in the game who aspire to God-like powers or actually end up having them. But it also refers to the fact that so many computer game plots are so hopelessly lame. We’re all still trying to figure out how to tell stories in this relatively new medium we’re no more sophisticated in the use of the tools of our medium than the Greeks and Romans were in theirs.
We always seem to resort to brute force, Deus Ex Machina storytelling and I liked the kind of self-referential, we’re-doing-the-best-we-can-even-when-we-suck aspect of the title.
Finally, isn’t the computer you’re playing the game on just a God-in-the-Machine, in a sense? Deus Ex just worked for me on every level except pronouncability. And, by the way, it’s pronounced «Day-us-Ex,» not «Do Sex!»